Unjust Enrichment

How Japan's Companies Built Postwar Fortunes Using American POWs

Book Description

The use of American POW's as slave labor by Japanese companies is the great unresolved issue of the Second World War in the Pacific. Unjust Enrichment provides a forum for American servicemen to tell their own stories, while Linda Holmes gives the reader the historic context to recognize the seriousness of the crimes.

Bio: Linda Goetz Holmes has been interviewing and writing about World War II prisoners in the Pacific for over 30 years. She is the first historian appointed to the U.S. Government Interagency Working Group, formed in 1999 under the aegis of the National Archives to locate and declassify material about World War II war crimes.

About Holmes, Linda Goetz

Linda Goetz Holmes has been interviewing and writing about World War II prisoners in the Pacific for more than 30 years. She is the first Pacific War historian appointed to the U.S. Government Interagency Working Group, formed in 1999 under the aegis of the National Archives to locate and declassify material about World War II war crimes. Ms. Holmes has presented her findings before audiences at the National Security Agency Center for Cryptologic history, Nimitz Museum of the Pacific War (Admiral Nimitz Museum), and numerous civic groups, veteran’s organizations, and classrooms throughout the country.
To date, she has interviewed more than 400 exprisoners of war, their families, American and Japanese military personnel and historians, government and banking officials, and archivists from around the globe to authenticate what happened to our prisoners in Japanese hands, and why. Her 1994 book, 4000 Bowls of Rice: A Prisoner of War Comes Home, about Allied prisoners of the Japanese who built the Burma Railway, was selected for inclusion in the John E. Taylor Collection of military history and intelligence volumes at the National POW Museum at Andersonville, Georgia; and the Australian War Memorial.
Ms. Homes has used her professional career in broadcast and print reporting to bring renewed international attention to the treatment of Allied prisoners by the Japanese during World War II. She is on the Board of Directors of the Society of Silurians, the oldest press club in the United States, and the Overseas Press Club Foundation. She is an associate member of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers.
Ms. Holmes was born in White Plains New York, attended Scarsdale schools, and is a graduate of Wellesley College.